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what do you recommend connecting on a smart plug?

What do you think makes most sense to connect to a smart plug? I've seen suggestions of connecting the fridge, but won't all the stuff in my freezer go bad if I disconnect it for an hour? Is it good for the fridge's health to disconnect it so often?

Answers

  • CameronCameron Posts: 3Member

    Connecting a refrigerator to a smart plug makes sense, especially if it is an older refrigerator as it's less efficient than refrigerators manufactured recently. Your food will not go bad if your fridge/freezer is without power for 1 hour. The compressor in refrigerators are rated for tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of on/off cycles. It's possible that even if your refrigerator was not connected to a smart plug that it may not cycle on during an ohmhour if the temperature inside your fridge/freezer did not exceed the set temp on the thermostat (of course in that situation you wouldn't be saving electricity during an ohm ohm hour anyways.

    But as an example scenario: You participate on average 1 ohm hour/week/year and your refrigerator cycles on once an hour = 52 cycles, however that's 52 less cycles, so in my mind that's actually less wear and tear.

    Other options to connect a smart plug might be a space heater or any other electric radiant heater, wine fridge/cabinet, any light fixture w. a halogen or incandescent bulb.

  • WaterGuyWaterGuy Posts: 414Member, Moderator

    @[email protected], I'll second what @Cameron said about the fridge/freezer, and add a suggestion if you're worried about the food warming up: keeping your fridge full, and especially with liquids, will help it maintain its cool temperature during that hour.

    Other high-power devices to connect to your smart plugs might include portable A/C units, smart TVs, and other AV systems. I like finding uses for smart plugs that go beyond just saving energy, too--appliances that are convenient to be able to schedule or turn on/off remotely, like a whole house fan plugged in up in your attic.

  • AKPsi BAAC ChapterAKPsi BAAC Chapter Union CityPosts: 998Moderator
    edited May 2017

    Like @WaterGuy said, in addition to saving energy, Smart Plugs are great for other things like allowing you to turn things that are hard to access and turn on/off. They also offer other conveniences like putting things on a schedule, which could come in handy when you're on vacay and want to give people the impression you're home by scheduling your Smart Plug to turn on a lamp for a few hours in the evening.

    During the holidays, I use them to turn off my Christmas tree lights and other holiday lights outside.

  • Steve ReedSteve Reed Posts: 111Member

    I put smart outlets on our fountain pump, landscape lighting, and aquarium lighting (the plugs are also nice for use as a timer for these)

    I'd put on our the refrigerator, but ours is built in and I can't easily get to the back/outlet.

    If you have a pool, getting one on the pump is a big potential saver.

    If you use a laptop computer and usually leave it plugged in, you can add a switch to it, so you'll automatically use the laptop's batteries during ohmhours.

  • svalotyahosvalotyaho Posts: 2Member

    I was specifically told by TP-Link that their smart plug keeps turning off my fridge (and not turning it back on) because it IS older and less efficient. Does anyone suggest a smart plug that actually works with an older refrigerator?

  • John KJohn K Lake Forest - Hikers and Bikers TeamPosts: 554Member

    @svacal, these plugs will handle 1800W. Surely your fridge doesn't draw anywhere near that amount of power continuously. It must have a very high surge current when the compressor starts up. Usually, with newer refrigerators, the peak surge only lasts .1 or .2 seconds and the plugs can handle it. With your unit, I'm guessing the surge is lasting too long, but I haven't seen any smartplug that can handle more than 1800W. The real question is whether any smartplug can handle a longer surge and that is a spec I've never seen published for plugs.

  • WaterGuyWaterGuy Posts: 414Member, Moderator

    @svacal said:
    I was specifically told by TP-Link that their smart plug keeps turning off my fridge (and not turning it back on) because it IS older and less efficient. Does anyone suggest a smart plug that actually works with an older refrigerator?

    I noticed you posted this same question in multiple places--in the future, please stick to a single thread to help other users answer effectively and to reduce clutter. Thanks!

    Here's the other thread: https://forum.ohmconnect.com/discussion/1202/fridge#latest

  • SrelazSrelaz FullertonPosts: 115Member

    Personally I use them on the refrigerator, box fans in windows when it is cooler at night and it isn't worth running the AC, I put one on my Amazon Echo devices, TV/Blu-Ray, Game system, any plugs for the kids devices for school and their phones, stereo, coffee maker, microwave, basically anything that draws power even in its "off" state. I used to have a clock radio (I tossed it since I use my phone as my alarm clock), and the energy monitoring smart plugs tell a good story as to what is pulling current. I even go to the extreme of hitting the circuit breakers so that my water heater doesn't cycle on, the stove doesn't pull current for the clock, the thermostat doesn't draw power. That saves me .04 kWh.

  • Steve ReedSteve Reed Posts: 111Member

    @Srelaz said:
    I put one on my Amazon Echo devices, TV/Blu-Ray, Game system, any plugs for the kids devices for school and their phones, stereo, coffee maker, microwave, basically anything that draws power even in its "off" state.

    One thing to be careful of when using smart switches to kill "vampire draw" devices, is that many smart switches draw more power than the device in it's off state.

    A Wemo devices for example uses 1.5W each. and that is 24/7, on top of the usage of the device plugged into it.

  • ClaudiaClaudia San FranciscoPosts: 94Administrator

    I've put all my living room electronics on a powerstrip and a smart plug, and have the smartplug on a schedule to not be on late at night and midweek before early evening. i like that it shuts off my tv if i am watching too late! I also use one with a strip on a short, late night schedule to charge my phone, toothbrush, wireless headphones and speakers... small electronics where you want to avoid overcharging.

    i've also rotated my small appliances through a tplink with energy use measurement to get a sense of what they draw. no slow cooking for me on days with an #OhmHour.

  • AKPsi BAAC ChapterAKPsi BAAC Chapter Union CityPosts: 998Moderator
    Nice!
  • Kate from OhmConnectKate from OhmConnect Posts: 1,049Administrator

    @Claudia curious, what's your average forecast?

  • Kate from OhmConnectKate from OhmConnect Posts: 1,049Administrator

    @Steve Reed said:

    @Srelaz said:
    I put one on my Amazon Echo devices, TV/Blu-Ray, Game system, any plugs for the kids devices for school and their phones, stereo, coffee maker, microwave, basically anything that draws power even in its "off" state.

    One thing to be careful of when using smart switches to kill "vampire draw" devices, is that many smart switches draw more power than the device in it's off state.

    A Wemo devices for example uses 1.5W each. and that is 24/7, on top of the usage of the device plugged into it.

    How did you determine the Wemo was pulling that much? just curious. Seems llike a ton!

  • ClaudiaClaudia San FranciscoPosts: 94Administrator

    @Kate from OhmConnect said:
    @Claudia curious, what's your average forecast?

    probably around 0.15... part of the reason its low is that i tend not to be home, my highest baseline's are around .45 if I was actually home and had the slow cooker on.

  • Steve ReedSteve Reed Posts: 111Member

    @Kate from OhmConnect said:
    How did you determine the Wemo was pulling that much? just curious. Seems llike a ton!

    WeMo posted it in their community forum. It's not an easy number to find, which is unfortunate. I think all devices should have their energy usage clearly labeled.

    WeMo is Wifi based, an Wifi radios are not great for low power usage.

    1.5W is not a huge amount, but it's just something to remember when adding them to turn off a low power vampire drain devices

    If you can combine multiple devices it can still be worth it. We have several video games consoles and they are all plugged in to single power strip, which is controlled by a smart switch. So one switch kills several fairly high draw vampires.

  • tonykakkar2018tonykakkar2018 Posts: 1Member

    I will suggest you to go for TP-Link or Wemo smart Plugs. Furthermore, I have found some amazing recommendations of best smart plugs for Alexa and Alexa compatible Wifi Smart Plug.

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